Packing Tips

20151109_092116_resized_1For those “do-it-yourselfers”, here are a few packing tips to help with the process:

  • Don’t save all the packing for the same day! Begin packing well in advance of moving day, and pack over a period of time to make it less tiresome.
  • Pack one room at a time, and start with the areas that are least used, such as the basement or garage.
  • As you finish packing a box, mark the room location and a general description of the contents on the box- i.e.-“kitchen, pots & pans”. Have the writing on the box facing up, so you know which side of the box is up, and which is down. Labeling on the side of the box rather than the top will ensure you can read the label when the boxes are in a stack.
  • Keep items that belong together in the same box, such as electronic components with the wiring and remote controls that go with the items.
  • Similar items should be packed together. For example, delicate glassware should be packed with other fragile items such as china; not in a box with heavy items such as books, cans, or pots and pans.
  • As a general rule of thumb, pack heavier items like books and cans in smaller boxes and lighter things in progressively larger boxes. If you pack a large box with heavy items it may become too heavy to lift, or the box might collapse from the weight of the items.
  • Books should be packed in small, strong cartons; 1.5 cartons (book cartons) are recommended. The books should be placed cover to cover, alternating bindings to prevent pages from becoming interlocked and damaged. Make sure that the weight of the carton does not exceed 50 pounds.
  • Canned goods should also be packed in small, sturdy cartons. Do not pack beyond the limit of portability; approximately 24 cans is recommended.
  • China and glassware need special care. It is best to use a dish pack for such items, and plenty of packing paper, bubble wrap, or other padding materials. Use plenty of packing material as the materials are much less expensive than the items they protect. Large plates and heavy pieces should be placed on the bottom of the container, on edge. Smaller plates, cups, saucers and glasses go toward the top of the container. Plates and dishes should be placed in a vertical position with lots of paper in between. We recommend that you line the bottom of the carton with a 3″ cushion of crumpled packing paper, and that you place 2″ of paper in between each layer.
  • Clothing can be packed in large boxes or left in dresser drawers if light enough. Hanging clothing that you do not want to wrinkle should be moved in wardrobe cartons. We provide wardrobe cartons at no cost to you on the day of the move. The movers will move the clothing on hangers directly from your closet into the wardrobe box. Wardrobe cartons hold approximately 24″ of clothing.
  • Drawers in furniture should be emptied of breakables, liquids, or small loose items that could fall out, spill, or cause damage to the furniture. Lightweight clothing or linens can be left in dresser drawers.
  • Glass tops to furniture must be crated or packed in mirror cartons if being shipped out-of-state or stored. On a local move, they can usually be wrapped in paper pads and furniture pads, and safely moved in the moving truck.
  • Jewelry and other valuables such as legal papers and currency should be handled by you personally and kept in your immediate possession.
  • Kitchen utensils such as toasters, waffle irons, mixers, etc. should be clean before packing, wrapped individually, and placed in medium sized boxes. Place heavy durable pieces on the bottom and lighter pieces on the top, with lots of paper between layers to prevent against chipping or scratching.
  • Lamps bases: After removing the light bulb and lamp harp, wrap the base, harp, and bulb separately in packing paper. Use paper pads for larger lamps. Place them together in a carton, filling any unused space with additional crushed packing paper. More than one well cushioned lamp may be packed in a carton.
  • Lamp shades should never be wrapped in newsprint as the paper can stain the shade. Carefully wrap each shade in several sheets of clean tissue paper. To allow for movement, use a sturdy carton at least two inches larger all around than the shade. Line the carton with clean, crushed packing paper under the lamp shade to create a cushioned, protective layer. A small shade can be nested inside a larger one if you are sure they will not touch. Only one silk shade should be placed in a carton to avoid stretching the silk. Glass or Tiffany type lamp shades should be crated.
  • Linens should be put into large cartons or trunks. The carton should be lined with clean packing paper. Do not use newsprint as a liner as the ink may soil the fabric.
  • Mirrors, Paintings and Pictures: Small pictures and mirrors can be wrapped in packing paper or padded paper and placed on edge in a medium sized box. Larger mirrors and pictures should be padded, wrapped and placed in mirror cartons or crates for safe movement. It is best to consult with your moving consultant regarding the best way to move these items. Paper should never be permitted to touch the surface of an oil painting.
  • Records, Tapes and CDs should be placed in small cartons. Pack records on end, side by side to provide the greatest resistance to weight pressure.